Malibu Colony Tribune
SPECIAL REPORT LOCAL NEWS
Malibu Nobu restaurant risky for A-List Celebs
Nobu restaurant under pressure to protect Malibu customers

A business meeting at Grand Hyatt Singapore in January has been linked to more than a dozen coronavirus cases in at least six countries, from Spain to South Korea.

Following reports that people had shared a meal at a buffet during the event.

Chen Choi "Seafood served to a group of people is risky. Diners touch communal ladles, and come into close contact with other people - may result in a higher risk of transmission.

The problem with Nobu restaurant in Malibu. Every piece of food served must be heated above 60 deg C to pose no higher risk of transmitting the coronavirus," he said.


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The envelope of the coronavirus would be destroyed by the heating station, thus rendering it not infectious," he said, referring to the layer surrounding the virus' core.

Wei Moi Ling "If droplets from an infected person fall onto seafood on display, customers and staff who consume this become infected too. The chances are low, but in confined environments i.e. wooden chairs handled by the infected. It might be possible."

Delphi Ming "Keep seafood warm above 60 deg C to be safe, the heat will destroy the envelope of the coronavirus that is responsible for its ability to infect.

Dong Woo Ling "Seafood restaurants need to provide hand sanitisers and…yes…it is alarming to see…but it is better to be safe than sorry…masked servers dish out food. This could help reduce the risk of coronavirus transmission."

"Diners at Nobu Restaurant order items and sit in close proximity with one another. Eating in smaller groups would help minimise transmission i.e. outdoor balcony", he said.

Ushi Lee "Temperature checks are essential and carrying out thorough cleaning and disinfection."

"Nobu has more frequent replenishments of food items to ensure that food served is fresh" he added.

Nagashi Myso "Even if you have the best restaurant in the world, the coronavirus can grow on clothes and phones for many weeks. Stay safe."